Rylan Simpson, Ph.D. Police Officer Perception Project (POPP)






Rylan Simpson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
School of Criminology
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, British Columbia
Canada V5A 1S6

rylan_simpson@sfu.ca
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Conference Presentations
1. Simpson, R. “Constable Scarecrow: Findings from a police-directed field experiment regarding
motorist speed.” American Society of Evidence-Based Policing, Washington, D.C., June 2020. (Conference cancelled).
2. Simpson, R. “Inanimate but effective? Exploring the impact of a police cut-out on motorist
speed in British Columbia.” Canadian Policing Research Conference, Nicolet, Quebec, June 2020. (Conference cancelled).
3. Simpson, R., & Pappas, L. N. “The criminal justice funnel: Perceptions of police, courts,
and willingness to cooperate with officers.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Antonio, Texas, March 2020. (Conference cancelled).
4. Simpson, R. “Constable Scarecrow: An evaluation of a police-directed field experiment aimed
at reducing traffic speed.” Western Society of Criminology, Phoenix, Arizona, February 2020.
5. Pappas, L. N., & Simpson, R.. “Looping through the system: An analysis of perceptions of
courts and police.” Western Society of Criminology, Phoenix, Arizona, February 2020.
6. Simpson, R. “Guardian versus warrior: An exploration of police recruitment videos in
California.” Association for Criminal Justice Research, Oakland, California, March 2019.
7. Simpson, R. “The Police Officer Perception Project (POPP): Police appearance, policy, and the
importance of academic-police collaboration.” American Society of Evidence-Based Policing Conference, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 2019.
8. + Simpson, R. “Police vehicles as symbols of legitimacy." Society for Personality and Social
Psychology, Portland, Oregon, February 2019
9. Wetherell, K.†, & Simpson, R. “The face of the police in America: An examination of police
spokesperson characteristics.” Western Society of Criminology, Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2019.
10. Simpson, R., & Hipp, J. R. “A typological approach to understanding police agency
trajectories, 1993-2013.” American Society of Criminology, Atlanta, Georgia, November 2018
11. + Wetherell, K.†, & Simpson, R. “An investigation of the demographic trends of police
spokespersons within the United States.” UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium, Irvine, California, May 2018.
12. + Simpson, R. “Lock, load… and smile? Facial expressions and perceptions of the police.”
Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Atlanta, Georgia, March 2018.
13. Simpson, R. “Policing the suburban city: Lights, sirens, and the challenges of contemporary
patrol work.” Western Society of Criminology, Long Beach, California, February 2018.
14. Simpson, R, & Hipp, J. R. “At the intersection of typology and trajectory: Studying change
among police agencies in America.” Western Society of Criminology, Long Beach, California, February 2018.
15. Simpson, R. “What can time tell us regarding perceptions of police? Incorporating latency
information into experimental evaluations of dichotomous outcomes.” American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 2017.
16. + Simpson, R, & Biggs, J.* “High-visibility vests in public environments: A randomized
field trial of public-police engagement.” American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 2017.
17. + Simpson, R, & Li, X.† “Police spokespersons in America: A nationwide examination.”
American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 2017.
18. + Hipp, J. R., Kubrin, C. E., Bates, C. J., Branic, N., Contreras, C., Forthun, B. J., Kim, Y. A.,
Mioduszewski, M. D., Simpson, R., & Williams, S. A. “Studying the social ecology of crime in Southern California: An introduction to the ILSSC.” American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 2017.
19. Simpson, R. “Under the microscope: Perceptions of police in a laboratory environment.”
European Society of Criminology, Cardiff, Wales, September 2017.
20. Simpson, R. “Two versus four: Do fewer wheels result in more? Patrol strategies and
perceptions of the police.” Association for Criminal Justice Research, Sacramento, California, March 2017.
21. Simpson, R., & Hipp, J. R. “Cops in California: Identifying, describing and interpreting
patterns in department typologies.” Western Society of Criminology, Las Vegas, Nevada, February 2017.
22. + Simpson, R. “Perceiving police: Uniforms and attire influence social processes.” Society
for Personality and Social Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, January 2017.
23. Simpson, R. “Do uniforms matter? Experimental evidence from the Police Officer Perception
Project (POPP).” American Society of Criminology, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 2016.
24. + Simpson, R, & Hipp, J. R. “Spatially diverse policing: An examination of police typologies
across space and time.” American Society of Criminology, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 2016.
25. + Simpson, R. “The Police Officer Perception Project (POPP): An experimental evaluation
of factors that impact perceptions of the police.” UCI Social Ecology Poster Session, Irvine, California, March 2016.
26. Simpson, R, & Hipp, J. R. “What came first: The police or the incident? An examination of
police response to calls for service and crime.” Western Society of Criminology, Vancouver, British Columbia, February 2016.
27. Simpson, R, Gravel, J., & Wong, J. “Getting in people’s faces: On the symbiotic relationship
between the media and police gang units.” Western Society of Criminology, Vancouver, British Columbia, February 2016.
28. Simpson, R.. “The effect of patrol strategies on the public’s perceptions of the police.”
American Society of Criminology, Washington, D.C., November 2015.
29. + Simpson, R., Gravel, J., & Wong, J. “High-profile incidents, specialized policing, and
media reporting of gang-related homicides.” American Society of Criminology, Washington, D.C., November 2015.
+ Denotes poster presentation // * Denotes practitioner // † Denotes undergraduate student


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